MOORLACH CAMPAIGN UPDATE — School District Races (#27 – #19) — October 11, 2018

Welcome to the first of three Voter Guide editions for Orange County’s 27 school districts. The first group is the bottom third of school districts, having the largest Unrestricted Net Deficits in the county and the state, is the first piece below (see MOORLACH UPDATE — LAUSD vs. OC School Districts — September 18, 2018).

The first column is the ranking within the county on a per capita basis. The second column is the statewide ranking, out of 940 districts reviewed, on a per capita basis. The fourth column is the ranking of just the Unrestricted Net Position (UNP). The fifth column provides you with the population that the district serves. The sixth column is the actual UNP according to the audited Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. And the seventh column is the sum of the prior two columns, providing the actual cost per resident if they were to bring the district to a zero UNP.

Because we’re focusing on the finances, this is one opportunity for you to ask the incumbents what they’ve been doing to improve the situation. Accordingly, I’ve provided the names of the incumbents, regardless of party affiliation. One asterisk (*) signifies that the candidate is a registered Democrat, two asterisks (**) means they are declined to state, and four asterisks (****) signifies they are a registered Libertarian.

No asterisk means they are a registered Republican, and should be a safe vote (with one exception). If the name is in bold, I have endorsed. If in italics, they are a good vote for the position.

This group has two districts with no candidates this cycle. One district has no Republican candidates. Other blanks for areas means there are no Republican candidates.

For Irvine USD, I would advise against voting for the Republican candidate. He would attend Board of Supervisors meetings every week when I served and based on my observations, I am not sure he is up to the job.

The second piece is from KFI AM 640 and is a review, including a podcast, of Proposition 1 (also see MOORLACH CAMPAIGN UPDATE — 2018 Ballot Measures — September 21, 2018).

The third piece is a letter to the editor supporting Proposition 6 from State Historical Landmark Number 296, Copperopolis, in The Union Democrat.

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LOCAL NEWS

Propositioned – Prop 1 – How Do We Fund Affordable Housing?

posted by RJ Johnson @rickerthewriter

https://kfiam640.iheart.com/content/2018-10-11-propositioned-prop-1-how-do-we-fund-affordable-housing/

Propositioned - Prop 1 - affordable housing on the ballot

Welcome back to Propositioned! Hosted by KFI’s Kris Ankarlo, this limited series podcast is back to take a look at the 11 different propositions you’ll see at the ballot box this November 6!

Now in its third season, Propositioned is a chance for both sides on each question to make their case to you, the voter. Then you can take that information with you to the voter booth.

Today’s episode deals with Proposition 1, a general obligation bond that would authorize up the government to sell $4 billion in bonds to fund existing housing programs.

Supporters say the money could be a big help for families who have always dreamed of buying a home in California, but were unable to until now. Habitat for Humanity Orange County Chapter Vice-President Chris Biochi says Prop 1 could help 50,000 families and veterans realize that dream.

“Among families, the house is the single greatest vehicle for inter-generational wealth transfer,” Biochi told KFI’s Kris Ankarlo. “And that changes things for a family. I’m proud to work for an organization that does that on a daily basis and I think this proposition is a chance for us to start heading in that direction as a state, to start giving that opportunity to others.”

However opponents say borrowing money isn’t the right way to solve the affordable housing crisis in California. Republican state senator John Moorlach (R-Costa Mesa) says these types of projects should be paid for out of California’s general fund.

“I think the big tragedy is, is that, this year we’ve actually had what we would quantify as a budget surplus. We’ve had a little bit more in revenue than normal – $12 billion more in fact,” Moorlach said. “Well, why didn’t we go use a third of that to go ahead and pay the $4 billion?”

In the next episode of Propositioned, Kris takes a look at Prop 2, which also deals with housing – but this time for people with mental illness.

Listen to yesterday’s episode on the history of propositions in California here!

Here’s what the ballot says Proposition 1 will do:

Authorizes $4 billion in general obligation bonds for existing affordable housing programs for low-income residents, veterans, farmworkers, manufactured and mobile homes, infill, and transit-oriented housing. Fiscal Impact: Increased state costs to repay bonds averaging about $170 million annually over the next 35 years.

Here’s what a YES Vote Means:

A YES vote on this measure means: Allows the state to sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to fund veterans and affordable housing.

Here’s what a NO Vote Means:

A NO vote on this measure means: The state could not sell $4 billion in general obligation bonds to fund veterans and affordable housing.

Photo: Getty Images

Vote Yes on 6 — Repeal an unfair, regressive tax

https://www.uniondemocrat.com/opinion/6588716-151/letters-to-the-editor-for-october-11-2018

To the Editor:

Estimates suggest the new increase in gas tax will cost a typical family of four $779.20 or more per family, per year.

On Nov. 1, 2017, Californians became subject to an additional tax of 12.5 cents more per gallon of gasoline (and 20 cents more for diesel), also increasing auto registration fees as much as $175 a year — striking the wallets of hard-working families across the state.

The gas tax hike will not fix our roads — because politicians will continue to fraudulently raid and divert gas tax funds. This latest gas tax increase contains no guarantee that even a penny will go to roads.

Prop 69 did not end the raids of existing gas tax funds and allows the governor to spend gas tax money to fund budget shortfalls.

State Sen. John Moorlach — a CPA — released a stunning report showing that only 20 percent of existing gas tax goes to roads and Caltrans wastes half a billion dollars annually on extra staffing.

A 2016 study by the Reason Foundation shows that California spends 2.5 times the national average on roads.

• Nobody is denying that California’s roads are crumbling, but there’s plenty of money to repair the roads if the politicians put 100 percent of the existing gas tax revenue into doing the right thing.

But that’s not all, our present state budget surplus provides plenty of money to fix our roads.

Please vote Yes on Prop 6.

Al Segalla

Copperopolis

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MOORLACH CAMPAIGN UPDATE — City Council Races (#34 – 28) — October 2, 2018

The first piece below is a Voter Guide for seven of Orange County’s wonderful 34 cities. The question was how to recommend council candidates. Instead of doing it in alphabetical order or those within my Senate District first, I decided to do it in reverse order according to Unrestricted Net Positions and in five groups.

The first seven cities below need strong fiscal leadership. How Costa Mesa is in 34th place has me baffled. With South Coast Plaza and the Harbor Boulevard of Cars, it should be one of the strongest in the rankings.

The Voter Guide screening is simple. I first provide those candidates that are registered Republicans. For positions with no Republican candidates, I have no recommendation or I mention the Democrat (*) with whom I have a relationship. Those in bold are endorsed. Those in italics are a good first or second choice.

Smaller groupings allows me to provide more color, so here is the first of five.

Costa Mesa — Sandy Genis and I go back more than three decades as fellow Mesa Verde residents. We served as officers of the Homeowners Association back then. We have not always agreed on a number of issues, but we have enjoyed a good relationship. As a city planning professional, she brings the best skill set to the Mayoral position.

Newport Beach — I know all of the candidates personally, but one, Joy Brenner. I’m not sure about her party registration, as her publicly disclosed personal political contributions to Democrats are confusing. Although I’ve decided to stay neutral in all four districts, I am thankful for the fine relationships I enjoy with the incumbents, including their resolve on addressing the city’s pension issues.

Anaheim — Over the years I’ve built a rapport with Cynthia Ward. She knows the city and does excellent research. She has no elected experience, but she would bring a down to earth approach to this critical job. In District 6 there are two candidates who will do a great job. Patty Gaby brings a fresh citizens approach to the seat.

Huntington Beach — The easy road is to endorse all four of the incumbents. But, Ron Sterud is a financial planner who would bring these badly needed skill sets to the Council. Billy O’Connell is a friend, but this time consuming role interferes with his focus on his critical nonprofit organization.

The second piece is a recent letter to the editor in the Santa Maria Times.

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Vote yes on Prop. 6

https://santamariatimes.com/opinion/letters/letters-to-the-editor-bill-ostrander-on-ag-policy-take/article_307c601c-b150-5751-9f0f-520fe165c5d0.html

On Nov. 1, 2017, the tax on California gas increased another 12.5 cents per gallon (20 for diesel) plus increased our auto registration fees — up to $175. Even this latest increase contains no gaurantee our money will go to roads. State senator and CPA John Moorlach released a stunning report, only 20 percent of existing gas tax goes to roads.

The Yes on Prop. 6 campaign qualified to be on the ballot with nearly a million signatures (nearly double what is required) and has an alternative solution to fixing roads without a tax hike. Yes on 6 would save a typical family of four more than $700 a year.

The Yes on 6 campaign has over 25,000 donors statewide and over 20,000 volunteers working throughout California. It is wise to research: Why has the opposition raised $28 million from big corporate donors including more than $3.9 million from out- of-state special interests to raise our taxes? This means the Yes on 6 campaign is being outspent 28-to-1.

Kitt Jenae

Nipomo

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MOORLACH CAMPAIGN UPDATE — Proposition 6 — August 11, 2018

Campaign season has started and November 6th is not that far off. One of the ballot measures you will be voting on is Proposition 6, which would repeal the gas and auto tax increase voted in by the Democratic supermajority and one Republican last year with Senate Bill 1.

The battle over Prop. 6 will be between taxpayers and tax-eaters. The “tax-eaters” are the cities, counties and state that will be fixing the roads. It is also the companies that will be retained to assist in this effort. So, the private sector industries benefiting from the taxpayers will be opposing this ballot measure in order to protect their potential profits. As they say, “when money talks, the truth is silent.” So you will hear plenty of reasons to oppose Prop. 6 by this well funded, and selfishly motivated constituency.

The sad story is that if this collaboration of tax-eaters could just convince Caltrans to be one of the better managed Departments of Transportation, we could have avoided this debate. Governor Brown failed in improving this department.

The “taxpayers” are you and your neighbors who are feeling the stress of being overtaxed. Last month, in the 29th Senate District, the voters showed their dissatisfaction with the gas tax increase by recalling their Senator, who had voted for it. The natives are definitely restless and this will be a fierce fall campaign battle.

The titular leader of the Proposition weighs in with two similar editorial pieces. The first is from the San Diego Union-Tribune and the second is from the San Francisco Chronicle. Carl DeMaio has been the energy bunny on this issue and continues to lead the charge. If you’ve been reading my UPDATEs since my election to the State Senate, you’ll see my research in both pieces.

Why Californians should repeal gas tax

By Carl DeMaio

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/opinion/commentary/sd-utbg-prop6-gas-tax-repeal-20180803-story.html

Californians are struggling as the cost of living skyrockets higher. Unfortunately, state politicians are simply adding to the financial strain on working families with massive increases in our gas and car taxes.

That’s why it is important to vote Yes on Proposition 6 to repeal these regressive and unfair tax hikes that will increase the cost of living for the typical family of four by up to $800 more per year.

It gets worse! If we don’t pass Proposition 6, the car and gas tax hikes are slated to increase every year automatically — without a vote of the people.

This year Californians will pay nearly $1 more per gallon because of taxes, fees and other government mandates. By 2021, many Californians will be paying close to $2 more a gallon extra because of taxes, fees and other government mandates — that’s up to $40 extra each time you fill up your car.

Everyone agrees we need to fix our roads, but state politicians and special interests are lying to voters when they claim the gas and car tax hikes will be used to fix our crumbling roads.

As we have seen in the past, the gas tax money is largely diverted away from roads and what little funding that is provided to roads is riddled with waste, fraud and abuse.

State Sen. John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa, released an independent analysis of CalTrans’ budget showing that only 20 percent of the gas tax funds were spent anywhere near roads.

Where do the politicians divert the gas tax money to? The funding has been diverted to cover budget deficits so politicians can continue to spend in other areas like higher salaries and pensions for state workers. For example, bus drivers in the Bay Area are earning six figures annually — with one bus driver earning $227,516 in pay and benefits last year alone!

Of the funds actually spent on infrastructure, the majority of funds get diverted from roads to transit buses, light rail projects, bike lanes (to replace roads), and even park land acquisition.

Our existing transportation agencies are riddled with waste and inefficiency. A recent study by the Reason Foundation shows for every $1 spent on average nationally to maintain or repair a mile of roadway, California spends $4.7 dollars for the same mile — a waste inflation factor of 470 percent.

Politicians will try to mislead you by bringing up the recently approved Proposition 69. Written entirely by politicians themselves, it is not the “lock box” they claim it is.

First, Proposition 69 did not cover all of the gas tax and transportation taxes we have to pay. Second, Proposition 69 contained zero accountability on where the gas funds will be spent — transit, bike lanes, parks, rail projects, etc. could receive all the funds instead of roads. Finally, the gas tax measure is specifically written to allow the governor to transfer the funds to cover General Fund shortfalls without a vote of the legislature or the people.

By voting Yes on Proposition 6 you can back a better solution to fix our roads without tax hikes.

Consider this simple fact: Before the latest gas and car tax hikes, Californians already paid one of the highest gas tax rates in the nation. That provides more than enough funding to have great roads, but only if the money is properly spent.

The Proposition 6 coalition not only seeks the repeal of the gas and car tax hikes, but we propose all of the previous gas tax be spent entirely on roads. We also propose earmarking the sales tax on cars to regional, inter-modal transportation projects. Finally we would impose significant accountability, efficiency and transparency reforms to make sure our funds are effectively spent.

A Yes vote on Proposition 6 will provide immediate tax relief to working families to help them with their cost of living. A Yes vote on Proposition 6 sends a message to out-of-touch politicians that we must make California more affordable, not less affordable. And a Yes vote on Proposition 6 puts us on the path to fixing our roads without a tax hike.

Nearly 1 million Californians signed the petition to get Proposition 6 on the ballot — Democrats, independents and Republicans all see our cost of living as unsustainable. Get more information on the Yes on Prop 6 campaign and join our grassroots effort by going to www.GasTaxRepeal.org.

DeMaio, a former San Diego City Councilmember, is Chairman of Reform California – Yes on Prop 6.

 

OPINION

Repeal California’s gas tax increase and require road repairs

By Carl DeMaio
https://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/article/Repeal-California-s-gas-tax-increase-and-13145858.php

In this era of divisive politics, here’s something everyone can agree on: The cost of living in California is way too high. And the recently imposed increases in the state gasoline taxes and vehicle fees will hit working families hard by increasing the cost of living for the typical family of four by roughly $800 per year.

These tax increases are unfair, regressive and simply too much. That’s why nearly 1 million Californians from all walks of life signed the petition to get Proposition 6, the “Voter Approval for Future Gas and Vehicle Taxes and 2017 Tax Repeal Initiative,” on the ballot. Democrats, independents and Republicans all see our cost of living as unsustainable.

In addition to providing immediate tax relief to working families by repealing the gas tax and vehicle fee increases, a “yes” vote on Prop. 6 sends a message to out-of-touch politicians that we must make California more, not less, affordable.

If we don’t pass Prop. 6, a gas tax is slated to increase every year automatically — without a vote of the people.

This year, Californians will pay nearly $1 more per gallon because of increased taxes, vehicle registration and commercial weight fees and other government mandates such as the cap-and-trade assessment on fuels. By 2021, many Californians will be paying close to $2 more a gallon extra because of taxes, fees and other government mandates.

In addition to fighting the higher costs, a “yes” Prop. 6 will end this fraud being perpetrated by Sacramento: That the state spends the money to fix our roads. Want proof? Prior to these gas and car tax increases, California drivers were already paying some of the highest gas taxes in the country, and yet we still have the fourth-worst roads, according to Business Insider.

State Sen. John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa (Orange County), a certified public accountant, has called out a California Legislative Analyst Office’s analysis of state highway and road programs funding and spending that shows only 20 percent of the gas tax funds were spent on roads.

The politicians will claim that Proposition 69, the “Transportation Taxes and Fees Lockbox” initiative approved by 81 percent of the electorate in June, provides a guarantee for road spending, but that is a flat lie.

Prop. 69 fails to cover all the transportation taxes we pay. It fails to guarantee even a single penny for roads. Instead, Prop. 69 allows the money to be diverted to a wide range of programs, including bike lanes, parkland acquisition, transit programs, light rail, and the state’s debt-ridden government pension program. Finally, the law gives the governor the ability to transfer all gas tax funds to cover General Fund shortfalls without even a vote of the Legislature or the people!

Bottom line: There is no guarantee for roads in these more recent gas and vehicle tax increases.

What little money that does make it to the roads is riddled with waste, fraud and abuse. The Reason Foundation’s Annual Highway Report reveals that California spends 2.6 times per mile more than the national average on state-controlled highways.

In 2014, California state auditors slammed Caltrans for “weak cost controls” that “create opportunities for fraud, waste and abuse.” Those same auditors also found Caltrans is overstaffed by 3,500 employees at a cost of a half billion dollars a year. One Caltrans engineer even golfed for 55 days while on the clock!

There is a better plan to fix our roads and transportation systems without a tax increase that will hurt working families.

The Prop. 6 coalition not only seeks the repeal of the gas tax and vehicle fee increases imposed by the Legislature this year, but we propose that 100 percent of gas tax revenues be spent on roads. We also propose earmarking the sales tax on autos for regional inter-modal transportation projects approved by voters in the region served. Finally, we would impose significant accountability, efficiency and transparency reforms to make sure our tax funds are effectively spent.

A “yes” vote on Prop. 6:

•Puts us on the path to fixing our roads without a gas tax increase.

•Gives struggling working families a break when they need it the most.

Carl DeMaio, a former San Diego city council member, is the chairman of Reform California — Yes on Prop 6. For more information, go to www.GasTaxRepeal.org To comment, submit your letter to the editor at SFChronicle.com/letters.

 

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This e-mail has been sent by California State Senator John M. W. Moorlach, 37th District. If you no longer wish to subscribe, just let me know by responding with a request to do so.

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