MOORLACH UPDATE — California School District Rankings, Group 2 — August 14, 2018

The second of 14 editions of California’s school districts finds us finishing up those that have unrestricted net assets, versus unrestricted net deficits.

Only two school districts have not made their comprehensive annual financial reports (CAFRs) available. This is a very small segment, considering we’ve obtained the information for nearly 1,000 districts.

We have shown these two districts at a zero unrestricted net position (UNP), but actual numbers may vary depending on some disclosure by Big Sur Unified and Linns Valley-Poso Flat Union. Based on the percentages, casting them at zero may not be a charitable gesture, as those serving a small constituency have fared better in this ranking.

We just found, in looking for a third missing audited financial statement, that another two districts have paired up for their CAFR, so we’re now focused on 935 reporting entities.

We also have our first Orange County school district, which is the only one in County to have a positive UNP. It is Fountain Valley Elementary and it is in 102nd place. Rankings 67 to 132 are provided below first.

I wouldn’t want to leave you without an interesting update discussion of SB 1421, which is provided by the Daily Bulletin and the OC Register at the very bottom below (see MOORLACH UPDATE — SB 1421 and SB 828 — May 31, 2018 and MOORLACH UPDATE — California Cop Culture — June 19, 2018).

66 Belleview Elementary Sonora Tuolumne 45 1,711 $ 697,730 $ 408
67 Wheatland Wheatland Yuba 16 7,531 $ 3,062,000 $ 407
68 Montgomery Elementary Cazadero Sonoma 63 881 $ 354,783 $ 403
69 Hart-Ransom Union Elem Modesto Stanislaus 23 4,453 $ 1,783,705 $ 401
70 Mark West Union Elem Santa Rosa Sonoma 7 14,858 $ 5,900,143 $ 397
71 Firebaugh-Las Deltas Uni Firebaugh Fresno 14 8,998 $ 3,352,744 $ 373
72 Semitropic Elementary Wasco Kern 92 368 $ 129,145 $ 351
73 Douglas City Elementary Douglas City Trinity 69 831 $ 290,410 $ 349
74 Elkins Elementary Paskenta Tehama 100 270 $ 91,495 $ 339
75 Bogus Elementary Montague Siskiyou 93 358 $ 118,339 $ 331
76 Garfield Elementary Eureka Humboldt 96 331 $ 107,899 $ 326
77 Jefferson Elementary Paicines San Benito 107 203 $ 65,049 $ 320
78 Trinity Center Elementary Trinity Center Trinity 91 424 $ 131,760 $ 311
79 Gazelle Union Elementary Gazelle Siskiyou 102 290 $ 89,235 $ 308
80 Kenwood Kenwood Sonoma 29 4,276 $ 1,291,001 $ 302
81 South San Francisco Unif So San Francisco San Mateo 2 82,935 $ 22,830,283 $ 275
82 Flournoy Union Elementary Flournoy Tehama 104 267 $ 72,816 $ 273
83 Cuddeback Union Elem Carlotta Humboldt 79 892 $ 220,293 $ 247
84 Indian Diggings Elementary Somerset El Dorado 110 164 $ 39,078 $ 238
85 Waukena Joint Union Elem Tulare Tulare 75 1,021 $ 235,246 $ 230
86 Stone Corral Elementary Visalia Tulare 83 745 $ 170,096 $ 228
87 Lake Elementary Orland Glenn 101 418 $ 90,128 $ 216
88 Happy Camp Union Elem Happy Camp Siskiyou 72 1,304 $ 270,429 $ 207
89 Pine Ridge Elementary Auberry Fresno 84 897 $ 168,329 $ 188
90 Di Giorgio Elementary Arvin Kern 82 967 $ 180,048 $ 186
91 Browns Elementary Rio Oso Sutter 89 975 $ 135,317 $ 139
92 Klamath River Union Elem Horse Creek Siskiyou 109 470 $ 60,376 $ 128
93 Robla Elementary Sacramento Sacramento 19 20,773 $ 2,656,403 $ 128
94 Paradise Elementary Modesto Stanislaus 94 936 $ 118,285 $ 126
95 Rockford Elementary Porterville Tulare 85 1,344 $ 164,825 $ 123
96 Caliente Union Elementary Caliente Kern 95 964 $ 115,753 $ 120
97 Junction City Elementary Junction City Trinity 103 695 $ 81,391 $ 117
98 Twain Harte Twain Harte Tuolumne 48 5,468 $ 626,757 $ 115
99 Wasco Union High Wasco Kern 13 31,543 $ 3,357,016 $ 106
100 Round Valley Joint Elem Bishop Inyo 98 1,047 $ 104,672 $ 100
101 Kneeland Elementary Kneeland Humboldt 113 337 $ 26,881 $ 80
102 Fountain Valley Elementary Fountain Valley Orange 10 56,680 $ 4,442,293 $ 78
103 Indian Springs Elementary Big Bend Shasta 114 220 $ 16,282 $ 74
104 San Lucas Union Elem San Lucas Monterey 112 417 $ 28,309 $ 68
105 Raisin City Elementary Raisin City Fresno 87 2,129 $ 140,090 $ 66
106 Green Point Elementary Blue Lake Humboldt 115 233 $ 14,007 $ 60
107 North County Joint Union Hollister San Benito 80 3,668 $ 219,029 $ 60
108 Big Pine Unified Big Pine Inyo 99 1,820 $ 103,599 $ 57
109 Summerville Union High Tuolumne Tuolumne 51 9,824 $ 552,045 $ 56
110 Strathmore Union Elem Strathmore Tulare 70 5,820 $ 281,596 $ 48
111 Bonny Doon Union Elem Santa Cruz Santa Cruz 90 3,069 $ 134,295 $ 44
112 Alta-Dutch Flat Union Elem Alta Placer 105 1,950 $ 66,099 $ 34
113 Monte Rio Union Elem Monte Rio Sonoma 108 2,292 $ 60,948 $ 27
114 Oak Run Elementary Oak Run Shasta 117 608 $ 7,541 $ 12
115 Orchard Elementary San Jose Santa Clara 78 19,431 $ 223,597 $ 12
116 Modoc Joint Unified Alturas Modoc 106 5,941 $ 65,541 $ 11
117 Palo Verde Union Elem Tulare Tulare 116 2,810 $ 12,295 $ 4
118 Three Rivers Union Elem Three Rivers Tulare 118 2,363 $ 1,506 $ 1
119 Big Sur Unified Big Sur Monterey 119 465 $ – $ –
120 Linns Valley-Poso Flat Un Glennville Kern 120 642 $ – $ –
121 Fieldbrook Elementary McKinleyville Humboldt 121 876 $ (1,390) $ (2)
122 Somis Union Somis Ventura 123 3,295 $ (29,603) $ (9)
123 Lucerne Elementary Lucerne Lake 129 3,388 $ (58,603) $ (17)
124 Lassen View Union Elem Los Molinos Tehama 131 2,816 $ (79,639) $ (28)
125 Armona Union Elementary Armona Kings 149 6,533 $ (196,891) $ (30)
126 Golden Feather Union Elem Oroville Butte 135 2,756 $ (103,750) $ (38)
127 Big Lagoon Union Elem Trinidad Humboldt 122 462 $ (25,973) $ (56)
128 Vineland Elementary Bakersfield Kern 157 4,428 $ (253,793) $ (57)
129 Whitmore Union Elementary Whitmore Shasta 127 736 $ (45,336) $ (62)
130 Cutten Elementary Eureka Humboldt 166 5,307 $ (331,869) $ (63)
131 Bridgeville Elementary Bridgeville Humboldt 125 564 $ (36,684) $ (65)
132 Chowchilla Elementary Chowchilla Madera 274 22,462 $ (1,712,027) $ (76)

California bill takes aim at secrecy surrounding police officer personnel records

By tsaavedra |
Orange County Register

https://www.dailybulletin.com/2018/08/13/california-bill-takes-aim-at-secrecy-surrounding-police-officer-personnel-records/

https://www.ocregister.com/2018/08/13/california-bill-takes-aim-at-secrecy-surrounding-police-officer-personnel-records/

More than 40 years of police secrecy could begin to crumble if California lawmakers pass a new bill allowing the public release of personnel records for law enforcement officers involved in deadly force, on-duty sexual assaults and falsifying evidence.

Senate Bill 1421, by state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, is the latest effort to open police records in the name of transparency. Since 1976, California law enforcement officers have been protected by statutes and court rulings — the strictest in the nation — that make it illegal to release virtually all police personnel records, including those involving wrongdoing and disciplinary action.

Past efforts to undo those protections have been rejected under withering opposition by law enforcement unions, which argue that releasing confidential personnel information would endanger police lives, fuel lawsuits and make it more difficult for officers to do their jobs.

However, Skinner said her bill is more narrow than past efforts and focuses on only the most serious of offenses. Details such as home addresses, names of family members and telephone numbers would remain exempt from disclosure. Additionally, under Skinner’s proposal, the release of information could be delayed when there is an open investigation.

“I believe the bill really balances the rights of law enforcement with the right of the public to know,” Skinner said. “(The public) will have the ability to see the agency took (its concerns) seriously. … Until we have access, we won’t be able to determine that.”

Supporters of the SB 1421 say police transparency is key to gaining the trust of the community.

Current law “allows bad officers to perpetuate and bad supervisors to continue their behavior without it ever being known,” said James Chanin, a former American Civil Liberties Union lawyer who practices in San Francisco. “The quality of policing goes down.”

For example, an off-duty Buena Park police officer in March pulled his gun on a man he mistakenly thought had stolen a roll of Mentos from a convenience store. A video of the police gaffe went viral on the internet. Yet, under current law, it is highly unlikely the public will ever know whether the officer was disciplined or retrained. Even his name remains secret, though his face has been seen by a million viewers.

When a Cleveland officer in 2014 shot and killed 14-year-old Tamir Rice, a letter was released from his previous employer saying that agency had found him unfit to be an officer and allowed him to resign.

The release of that kind of information is a crime in California.

“The public has a right to know what’s going on with their taxpayer money, but not in this state,” Chanin said.

Existing law has become a safety net for bad cops, critics say.

In 2006, Berkeley police officers refused — citing state protections — to cooperate with a civilian probe into the theft of heroin, methamphetamines and other drugs from 286 envelopes in the evidence locker. Without police participation, the probe was unable to determine the extent of the security breach.

The Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights was passed by the Legislature in 1976 as a way to keep police supervisors from framing the rank-and-file in the heat of scandal. Before then, officers could be bullied into taking polygraph tests or face losing their jobs. Police brass, according to some stories, would lean on wives and families to get confessions from officers when politically expedient.

The bill of rights basically makes it difficult to fire police officers.

That bill was coupled with a 1978 statute that prohibited disclosure of police disciplinary files to the public without court approval. Those provisions are codified in Penal Codes sections 832.7 and 832.8.

Supporters were worried that criminal defendants were using police disciplinary records to fish for evidence that would help their cases.

California’s protections were made virtually impenetrable in 2006, when the California Supreme Court ruled in Copley Press v. Superior Court of San Diego County that civilian police commissions could not publicly disclose their findings on police misconduct. As a result, some commissions could no longer gain access to personnel files. Lobbyists for the police said these protections were necessary for officer safety.

Specifically, Skinner’s bill would allow for the disclosure of reports, investigations or findings for incidents involving the discharge of a firearm or electronic control weapons, strikes by weapons to the head or neck area or deadly force; incidents of sustained sexual assault by an officer; and findings of dishonesty by an officer.

The proposal is scheduled to be heard Thursday by the Assembly Appropriations Committee. It already has been passed by the Senate.

The Peace Officers Research Association of California opposes the bill because of what it believes are damaging side effects to police. Among the concerns, the group says, is that officers fearing their names might be disclosed might hesitate in the field before acting, creating a police safety issue.

State Sen. John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa, co-authored the bill and believes the benefits outweigh the risks.

“I’m trying to assist to getting to the truth and getting to the truth faster,” Moorlach said. “I think there has been a credibility concern about whether we are being told the truth.”

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